When Guns are Outlawed, Only Outlaws will have Parole and Probation

demetrius-colemanMeet Demetrius Coleman, career criminal, parolee and probationer who killed three people on their way to Thanksgiving dinner and injured four more, using nothing but a Hyundai Elantra and his own disregard for the law, and, of course, a big assist from the criminal-loving, victim-slaying bench. Police One:

David Bianco, his fiancee, Kaylie Meininger, and their 2-year-old daughter, Annika, were killed when Coleman hit their car and it burst into flames at an intersection, friends and relatives said. They had been driving to an uncle’s house for dinner.

What this story doesn’t say is that Bianco was thrown free, as was a rear-seat passenger who suffered severe head trauma. Meininger and little Annika in her car seat survived the impact, but burnt to death in the car, screaming their last moments in a Hell on earth as the flames roasted them beyond recognition.  (Some of those details are in this story).

Not that Satan’s servant Coleman, or the soulless monster of a judge who put him on the street, care.

Back to Police One.

“They were talking about the future and getting married,” Meininger’s cousin Brittany Puccio told KDKA-TV.

Coleman is charged with criminal homicide, vehicular homicide and aggravated assault with a vehicle among other charges in the Thanksgiving crash on a busy highway about 10 miles southeast of Pittsburgh. He remained hospitalized in police custody and didn’t have an attorney listed in court records.

He didn’t have a license, and the ownership of the Hyundai with which he did his worst does not seem to have been established.

Coleman, of Pittsburgh, sped away from the convenience store parking lot where he was pulled over once officers turned up the drug warrant while checking his identification, the complaint said. The crash scene, in North Versailles, was about 2 miles from the initial traffic stop.

Was this a one-time excursion from the straight and narrow path for young Coleman? What do you think?

Online court records show Coleman, 22, was on probation for a 2012 drug possession case when he was charged with drug possession with intent to deliver in March. He was sentenced to jail but was then paroled and had his probation on the former case extended.

Parole is evil. Probation is evil. 10-20-Life, and go straight to life for violent crimes in which a person is harmed or threatened with harm. Or death; the Supreme Court’s fuzzy love for offenders notwithstanding, Coleman has earned a short drop to a neck-snapping conclusion.

Accident reconstruction experts and other investigators were piecing together the crash, in which a second vehicle also was struck. Three women in that SUV were injured but survived.

Kill him. He’s worse than worthless. The more our jurisprudence diverges from Lex Talionis, the more judges, lawyers, social workers and other parasites are piled on to the burden that crime already imposes on the just and righteous. Kill him, and may God have mercy on his soul.

A female passenger in Coleman’s vehicle also was injured, police said.

That would have been his ho, one Asia Camp. She says she didn’t know nuffin, and he dindu nuffin, just a little “driving crazy.”

If the courts won’t kill him, bring back the Committee of Vigilance.

25 thoughts on “When Guns are Outlawed, Only Outlaws will have Parole and Probation

  1. Jim Scrummy

    In a state that where all of the governors for the past 30 or so years are too chicken-excrement to flip the switch on Wesley Cook (aka Abu-Jamal), and expecting this guy to get his “shots”? The herd does need to be thinned, and this POS, amongst others (including Wesley) need to be at the head of the line. He’ll get a manslaughter charge, maybe vehicular homicide, and 20 years, if we are lucky.

  2. Boat Guy

    Simple. Make each and every jurist liable for the actions of those they parole. Hiz/HerOnner in this case need to be charged with negligent vehicular homicide.Same for assigning probation.

    1. S

      Boat Guy has a worthy solution. However…..the problem was deliberately made, via the War on Drugs, and the wilful destruction of good morals in all communities, through infiltration, subversion, and compromises on the part of those who should have stood firm. Maybe better to start with the wreckers? Killing the lowlevels won’t fix it, and giving the higher ups the ability will result in cattle cars and chimneys for anyone with any chance of reversing the course to destruction. In the meantime, we have to suck it up, or become conductors on those trains.

  3. Aesop

    Parolees should be awarded points: 2 for re-offending, 5 for injury of death in the course of such crime(s). The point would accrue to the judge granting it. When any judge’s parolee tally surpassed 100, that judge would be removed from the bench for life, and disbarred, mandatorily, for public malfeasance.
    Home Depot needs greeters too.

    Offenses on parole, like driving offenses in construction zones, should be awarded double the standard sentence. Parolees should be housed in halfway houses, located by law in locations not farther than 1000 feet from a judge’s actual domicile, and no judge permitted to dwell anywhere farther than 1000 feet from at least one such institution. Parole advocacy employees would be required to live next door to such.

    Conviction rates would resemble Japan’s (north of >98%), and parole would be about as frequent in American jurisprudence as impeachment from office, in about 5 minutes.

    Switching to the 10-20-Life matrix would solve most of that as well, provided there was no “good time”, and each step required the entire sentence be served in prison.

    And the worse this gets, the more likely the recidivism will only be affected by streetside executions by armed citizenry. And the time draws nigh.

    But as we think of a two y.o. cooking to death in flames alive strapped into her carseat, it’s good to read Reason #10,362,432 of Why Drug Offenses Are A Victimless Crime, and that offenders in that one misbegotten category would never commit other crimes therefore.

    1. Loren

      10-20-life plus canning. 3 – 10 strokes on each and every anniversary of the crime/per victim. Something they and their victims can look forward to.
      Bring in hood rats for viewing. Bring em in nice and close so they get the full perspective.
      Or………….we can do it Barry’s way and let them out early. Which is more humane?

    2. John M.

      I’m no fan of the Drug War, but I’m reluctantly forced to admit that drug laws provide a helpful civilization test, almost like a shibboleth. Drug laws are not difficult to obey, and violation of them tends to indicate antisociality to a degree that it leads one to think that prison might not be a bad place for such people.

      -John M.

  4. Alan Ward

    Lamp posts ( especially in the hood of the offender) would not allow rope burns to innocent oaks. On the other hand post ligature fluid seepage would reward the tree with lots of fertiliser.

  5. Steve M.

    The system has gone from broken to Perverse. For every Dindu Nuffin, there’s an “Asia Camp” being funded by welfare from tax payers standing behind him with all the support their ghetto upbringing can muster. I find that to be most frustrating.

    Take away the welfare, the free medical, the addiction services, etc and the drug user market will die off in a few years. Certain lifestyles and choices lend themselves to early deaths, get out of the way and let them come.

    With real life circumstances like this occurring, I don’t understand why the average, decent American resists the very idea of a return to Biblical principles. They worked rather well for many years.

  6. "Greg"

    Less than worthless you say? (To which I agree) might I then suggest “negative worth” … by which the “less than worthless” values can be better numerically quantified?

  7. Kirk

    Somewhere, I saw a proposal called the “Judicial Responsibility Act”, wherein the officers of the court responsible for sentencing and parole decisions were held accountable for their actions, and if they reached a set number of cases of recidivism and reoffense, they were terminated from their jobs.

    From what I understand, they don’t even track these things–You want to know who sat on the parole board or made the clemency recommendations from the admin side, you often can’t even find that out. I think that as a minimum, you have someone like this clown commit more crimes, then the names and jobs of all concerned who had anything to do with his early release need to be publicized, so that the public can make their decisions with full data once they’re up for election or so that pressure may be applied by elected officials.

    I’ll tell you one damn thing: Crap like this keeps happening, and the pressure vessel is going to keep building up pressure. When it finally bursts? A whole bunch of people are going to suffer and die–And, the farking do-gooders who put them into those positions aren’t going to do more than wail and wring their hands as the blades drop. The irony is that they’ve basically created this situation, out of a mis-placed sense of sympathy for the criminal.

    End state of all this ain’t going to be pretty. The social pendulum swings, and the further you push it towards licentiousness and an utter lack of responsibility, the further it’s going to go on the backswing. The progressives seem to think that the arc of history only bends one way, theirs; the reality is that the more you warp it one way, the further it eventually goes in the other. I would not be a damn bit surprised to see a neo-Victorian era happen, much as the Victorians were a reaction and counter to the licentiousness of the Georgian and Regency eras.

    The time may come when we look back on the current set of practices with a certain fond nostalgia, while observing the reactionary idiots making jaywalking a capital crime…

    1. "Greg"

      Well, if jaywalking becomes a capital crime due to lack of available defendants for the more traditional capital crimes (rape, arson, murder, rape…) that’s not really a bad thing, is it? (maybe something like “demolition man”?… just as long as there is more choice than *JUST* taco bell???)

  8. Wysiwyg Mtwzzyzx

    Cue up Oingo Boingo’s “Only a Lad”…
    “Hey there Johnny boy, I hope you FRY”

    Like these ideas for judicial accountability. Most judges here (Cali), get elected by people who know absolutely nothing about them or their records. A good watchdog non-profit would be more than welcome.

  9. Docduracoat

    There is a proposal to pay doctors by results
    Getting people to quit smoking, take their medicine and exercise
    Why don’t we try that on lawyers and Judges?
    We will claw back 4% of your pay for every client who continues committing crimes

    1. Hognose Post author

      If we could figure out how to get the doctors to control patients’ smokimg amd exercise, we could just send the criminals to the doctors to get set on the path of smoking and metabolic syndrome! (You could say it violates, “First, do no harm,” but net-net it probably does good).

  10. staghounds

    I’m not a Pennsylvania lawyer, but I believe that endangering the public while fleeing from the police is a felony there. Felony murder carries life.

  11. Greg

    No defending the guy but from where I sit this was another needless pursuit resulting the deaths of innocents. At last one of the two PDs involved broke their own policies.

  12. Keith

    Go get a non repairable car. Once found guilty chain him into it. Soak in gasoline. Throw in a match. Show live on national TV. With full volume.

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