OT: One Jitbag Teen, Lax Canadian Laws, Hundreds of Lives at Risk

maple_leaf_1964Amazingly, even after he is convicted, the lax and lackadaisical slackers of Canadian law enforcement still threaten anyone who names “Obnoxious” — his own chosen screen name, and a fitting one — with consequences far more dire that the tap on the wrist that his crimes brought  him.

Obnoxious was a swatter, a woman-hating teen pervert who takes joy in sending SWAT teams to the homes of female video game players with bullshit crime stories, hoping to get the girls killed. Most law enforcement was supine before him.

And he was a juvenile, literally, as well as emotionally. So he can’t be named.

‘‘UNTOUCHABLE,’’ Finley saw him tweet once. ‘‘UNEXTRADITEABLE.’’

And he knew that as long as he targeted USians, Canadian law didn’t give a hairy rat’s ass about him. (The situation would be the same if reversed). As a minor, he could get away with anything, and he was going to see if he could get away with murder by false police report.

It took one small town detective, BA Finley of Johns Creek, GA, and one FBI agent willing to pursue a case served to him on a platter — after swarms of other agents blew the case off — to finally give the Canadians enough evidence to shame them out of their inertia.

Obnoxious often sent a text to his target telling her that the SWAT team was on its way — too late to stop it — just so she would know it was him. Sometimes victims received phone calls from the police before the SWAT team arrived. A Canadian Twitch streamer named Maple Ong got a call one night in January 2014, telling her to leave her house with her hands up, along with her panicked father and younger brother, so the police could search it for bombs that Obnoxious had told them were placed there. Allison Henderson, a 26-year-old artist and streamer who lived with two other streamers in Costa Mesa, Calif., received a phone call one night from a woman with the Police Department, asking her how many people were in her apartment and what she was wearing. Allison and her roommates had recently been DDoSed and harassed by Obnoxious. The policewoman told Allison to step outside with her hands above her head.

‘‘I held my breath and slowly opened the door to the sight of rifles pointed at me from every direction,’’ she says. ‘‘It was the most terrifying experience of my life.’’ When officers questioned her, she couldn’t make them understand. ‘‘They were completely lost on the idea of a stranger harassing us over the Internet,’’ she says. ‘‘It’s a feeling like you’re drowning, and the person doesn’t understand what water is.’’

A few months after Obnoxious swatted Janet and her family, he swatted them again. The officers who showed up this time seemed irritated at Janet, ‘‘like it was my fault that I got swatted, because I do what I do, because I play video games.’’ She says one told her, ‘‘Just pick up a book.’’ The officers who responded to these calls did a professional job — in the sense that they assessed the situation, de-­escalated it and didn’t fire their weapons. At the same time, they misjudged what they were seeing. They didn’t grasp that each swatting was merely a spike in a long-­running pattern of abuse that would continue when they drove away.

via The Serial Swatter – NYTimes.com.

In the end, BA Finley, the small-town investigator, taught himself how to follow an investigation into the maze of cyberspace — described in enough detail to make it worth your while to Read The Whole Thing™, and he and his FBI agent finally got the Canuckistanis off the X.

The Canadian police arrested the suspect on Dec. 5, four days after he tried to swat Hayli. Much of the case against him had been shipped up from Georgia. Prosecutors eventually charged him with 46 counts, including criminal harassment, public mischief and extortion; he pleaded guilty to 23 counts. (His Vancouver lawyer didn’t return phone calls.) He was interviewed at length by a social worker, a psychiatrist and a psychologist, who confirmed that the swatter’s childhood had been tragic, marred by an abusive father and a mentally ill mother. The psychiatric report noted that he had essentially no remorse: ‘‘His description of the pleasure he gets from causing humiliation and harm … is suggestive of quite significant emerging psychopathic traits.’’ At a court appearance in May, he wore a sweatsuit, ankles shackled together; a local reporter observed him smiling occasionally and flicking his brown hair. In July, a judge sentenced him to 16 months in youth jail, with credit for time served while awaiting trial. He is scheduled to be released in March, at age 18.

There you have it. A huge investigation — 1,000 of Finley’s hours alone, literally half a working year — and this complete waste of sperm and egg plea-bargained his way into an even faster turn of the revolving door than is normal for North American criminals.

He is a worthless waste of protoplasm, a miscue of sperm and egg, an assemblage of defective parts that even Planned Parenthood would hesitate to place on the market. And the Canuckistani courts are putting him back on the internet in three months.

21 thoughts on “OT: One Jitbag Teen, Lax Canadian Laws, Hundreds of Lives at Risk

  1. Cap'n Mike

    That story brings Charles Ng to mind.
    A monster among serial killers (Raped women after murdering their children in front of them) that fled to Canada.
    The Canadian Government made his extradition to California conditional on his not being eligible for the death penalty.
    The U.S. response was “you can keep him”
    He was eventually extradited, convicted and sentenced to death.
    Just in case this gave you any faith in the American legal system, the bastards been on death row for over 15 years and will probably never be executed.

    1. Hognose Post author

      Mexico will not extradite to the US except under the same condition. If I was king, we’d hang ’em hall, hang ’em all, hang the long and the short and the tall.

  2. staghounds

    First off, GO FINLEY.

    Hint to Finley and the victims- revealing the juvenile criminal’s name is only contempt of court or a crime IN CANADA. Georgia and California don’t care.

    Also, assuming there are outstanding Juvenile arrest warrants/attachments out for him entered in NCIC, Swatboy won’t be coming to the U. S. and might be arrested if he does.

    Also also vik, Ker v. Illinois. (And U. S. v Yunis – http://openjurist.org/924/f2d/1086/united-states-v-yunis)

    1. Hognose Post author

      IANAL but it looks like under Yunis he’s fortunate we didn’t put the habeas grabass on him in his bedroom in Coquitlam, but let his fellow Canadians do the deed (no doubt in the best interest of continuing good relations with our neighbors to the north, who might go beyond just complaining about cultural domination and acid rain if we started snatching their criminals or entrapping them into international waters for the grab).

      Some day, the full story of some of the great grabs of the eighties and nineties might get told. Now is probably too early.

  3. obsidian

    This clown is a future murder victim, all he has to do is Swat the wrong people and they will go visit him.
    >Not wishing any harm to come to him<

    1. Boat Guy

      He MIGHT wind up as a victim but I’ll wager pounds to pennies thsi punk’s gonna escalate if he’s not stopped.

  4. Pat

    Canadian here – I live in Vancouver and work in Port Coquitlam, a stone’s throw from where this piece of shit lives. I’ll be vigilant when this cowardly asshole gets out.

    I’d like to apologize (as us Canadians do) for the spineless criminal justice system allowing him to get off with such a light punishment for his crimes, and also for the lack of effort on the part of our law enforcement system to actually catch and stop him.

    I’m a retired Army reservist, nothing high-speed in my CV, but I just wanted to pass on my thanks for your blog and its content, which I find fascinating, especially the Gun Tech section. Not all of us up here are liberals!

    1. Hognose Post author

      Our courts are equally messed up, just based on different laws, brother. Everybody struggles with what to do with a juvenile, as if a 17 year old who is already showing sociopathic tendencies has any practical hope of rehabilitation.

      1. Distant Thunder

        Agreed. What should have happened (though Canadian law didn’t allow for it) was this ass should have been charged as an adult and given a effective life sentence. I’d open up the possibility of parole after 15 years if by some miracle he reforms, but I doubt that would happen.

        “Obnoxious” is someone who has become a psychopath, and such a person can only be imprisoned or killed. They aren’t going to get better.

  5. Buckaroo

    Does anybody else here think it’s rather disturbing that swatting is so easily done? Do police departments feel any shame for letting themselves get duped into terrorizing innocent people? It’s pretty easy (and quick) to figure out that the guy who called 911 is thousands of miles away. It seems like cops are much more eager to jump in the van and stack up outside the door, than actually put some measures into place to establish the validity of a 911 swatting call.

    1. unistat76

      Where I work we had a swatting called in. The problem is that the regular non-emergency line has no caller ID. I’m not kidding. 80’s technology is unavailable to us. So if the swatter calls that line, we can’t auto-locate like with 911.

      This Dbag teenager from Georgia called in on a rival gamer here in Michigan, pretending to be the rival holding his family hostage after killing the dog. Fortunately our dispatcher was not a moron and realized pretty quickly what was up, but he is a gamer too. I doubt that one of the older ladies would have twigged to it.

      We sent one officer. We called the number of the supposed hostage takers house and asked a few questions while the officer was on the way over. He got there and confirmed that all was well. End of line.

      I will say our dispatcher had a good time with the Dbag from Georgia while he had him on the phone.

        1. unistat76

          No the ID came from the victim. There was an ongoing beef between the two. Really all we had was the victim’s suspicion that the Georgia Dbag did it. Convincing enough for us, but not for a court.

          1. Hognose Post author

            That’s the kind of thing where if he’s in your own jurisdiction you can talk to the guy and let him convict himself. (These guys are all so much smarter than cops, and they love the sound of their own voices). But if he’s in another state, you’re screwed.

  6. Red

    This happened to someone a mile or so from my house last year. Some sore loser called in and said there was an active shooter that had taken coworkers (some Youtube gaming channel’s office I believe) hostage, etc etc. Close enough to several schools to cause lockdowns, and the whole thing was captured on the gamer’s webcam. The police decided that the best course of action was to throw down and cuff everyone in the building, and didn’t pick up on the fact that they were, well, playing videogames. I’m surprised nobody got shot.

  7. ToastieTheCoastie

    I worry about the cops getting the wrong address some night and shooting me, on the off chance they decide to raid the grow op next door sometime.

  8. BAP

    I was sort of involved in a similar situation but in the police side. There used to be this iPhone app that would make it look like you were calling from a different number and this guy was calling the local PD pretending to be this girl saying she was going to kill her kids. I was along for a ride along when the second call came through IIRC, luckily the cops had a good feel for the situation and didn’t even draw a weapon (just a couple beat cops knocking on the door). But they had no clue how her number could be showing up. So I told them about the app and they were able to track the little spaz down. (Who no surprise ended up being legit crazy)

    Hats off to the local PD though, they did everything with just regular officers and there responses were very measured.

  9. JAFO

    I’m aware of one incident in the ’80s where our brothers to the North released a guy we wanted for selling some sensitive technology to an obvious KGB front by putting him on a plane to Boston and tipping off the Feebies. When he didn’t get off the plane, the agents got on and found him handcuffed to his seat. I think the RCMP got their handcuffs back along with some liquid refreshments.

    The problem was that our extradition treaty didn’t cover illegal export of technology.

    The case was broken when after buying the item the guy asked to use the xerox machine at the seller’s office and left his original on the copier. The document was a contract to sell the same item to the Romanian National Import-Export Company, or some such. This is what FBI Special Agents call a ‘clue’

  10. archy

    Please Santa: For Christmas, just tell me that once this guy is cut loose and no longer a juvenile, his photo will be released once he’s sent back. Oh that, and a woodchipper, please.

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  12. Keith

    You are not responsible for what others do to you. You are however responsible for the choices you make. It is not your mothers fault. It is not your fathers fault. It is not your families fault. It is not your environments fault. It is not the TV’s or the computers fault. It is not the jobs fault. It is not your schools fault. You are responsible for the choices you make. Not going to apologize for saying that.

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