When Guns are Outlawed, Only Outlaws will have Knives

Luis Class, one of the few crims in the knife melee who was old enough to be named. Note the way he wears his shirt, and the look of keen intelligence -- not.

Luis Class, one of the few crims in the knife melee who was old enough to be named. Note the way he wears his shirt, and the look of keen intelligence — not.

The mayor says his city, New Bedford, Massachusetts, where guns are pretty much outlawed, “will not tolerate youth violence,” a nice euphemism for the gang activity that keeps the good citizens of the bad neighborhoods locked indoors.

For someone who doesn’t tolerate gang crime, he sure has a lot of it. Case in point, a gang melee that left a 15-year-old dead and a bunch of his friends and enemies in cuffs:

The slain teen was identified yesterday morning as Mateo Morales by Bristol District Attorney Thomas M. Quinn.

In addition, a 16-year-old juvenile male has also been charged with assault and battery with a dangerous weapon, Quinn said.

Police say Morales was already dead when they arrived at Middle and Chancery streets shortly after 6:20 p.m.

Two other male stabbing victims, ages 16 and 22, were treated for minor injuries.

They’ll get a quick cycle-around in the gentle Massachusetts courts, and be bagged for their next crimes of violence within five years.

Meanwhile, the Attorney General can’t make up her mind (if this guy is Class, she is No Class, same blank expression) about whether .22 rifles should be banned or not. And she does nothing to fight violent, drug, and gun crime. In case you were wondering why MA more than doubles the per-capita homicides of demographically similar NH.

6 thoughts on “When Guns are Outlawed, Only Outlaws will have Knives

  1. redc1c4

    he only had a knife because he was getting his life together by attending the culinary academy…

  2. Andy

    I dont understand the charges. Has the killer not been determined, or does the death simply not “count” because gang brawl? I’m OK with the latter, as criminal-on-criminal violence resulting in the death(s) of one or more criminal is desirable.

    1. Hognose Post author

      I may be mistaken about this, but I believe Massachusetts does not have “all for one and one for all” murder charge that hangs the homicide equally on all participants. That’s often called “felony murder” in other states, which confuses people (when is murder not a felony?) but appears to be legalese shorthand for “murder in commission of a felony.” So in MA, if I’m right, only the actual stabber eats the murderer charge, his associated get tagged as “accessories” (which, as I understand it, and I may be wrong, is a more serious felony if they are accessories before the crime — that is, assisted in planning and preparing for the crime — or after the fact — that is, assisted in covering up, concealing evidence, generally obstructing justice).

  3. JAFO

    Quite correct.

    Felony murder is an old common law concept that holds all of the participants in a felony responsible for the natural consequences of their decision to commit the felony. For example, if Plunckett and Maclaine jointly rob a coach, and Plunkett shoots and kills one of the passengers, both are responsible for the murder.

    The Massachusetts SJC rejected the common law theory of felony murder in Comm v. Tejeda, 473 Mass 269 (2015).

    Accessory before the fact in Massachusetts is codified at c 274 sec. 2. It carries the same penalty as the principal crime. Accessory after the fact is a seven year felony under c.274 sec 4, with the curious provision that certain relatives are immune from prosecution. So in Massachusetts you can help your Mom get away from the cops without fear of prosecution.

    I would make an educated guess that the two guys mentioned in the article were charged with the less serious offenses in order to hold them while the investigation continues.

    1. John M.

      “Accessory after the fact is a seven year felony under c.274 sec 4, with the curious provision that certain relatives are immune from prosecution.”

      This is called “the Billy Bulger clause.”

      -John M.

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