Seeing Double?

We dunno. We think we like the Arsenal double-pistol better, but you have to admit these are easy on the eyes:

cabot_jones_double_01

It’s just a pair of decent custom 1911s… on Gunbroker… but wait… one’s a perfect mirror image of the other. You know, for when you go run IDPA stages dual-wielding like an action hero.

Oh, wait, IDPA doesn’t allow that? Sissies.

Here’s the GunBroker listing blurb:

If perfection saw double it would be this: a perfectly inverted pair of Jones 1911s.

cabot_jones_double_03

Cabot Guns is committed to doing the things others believe to be impossible. Unlike other manufacturers, Cabot doesn’t stop simply with mirrored control surfaces and a reversed ejection port. They engineer their pistols to be perfectly inverted true-copies of one another, going so far as to reverse the rifling in the left-handed model to guarantee smooth, true felt recoil and follow through directed towards the shooter’s palm.These guns feature everything you’ve come to expect from ultra-premium craftsmanship; precision checkering at the front and back straps, a national match grade barrel, finished with blued steel, artist crafted cocobolo grips, and gold bead front sights.

These are sold strictly as a pair.

Model :Jones Mirrored 1911
Caliber : .45 ACP
Action : Semi-auto blowback
Feeding : 7-rd magazine
Barrel : 5″
Finish : High Polished Blued

“They are sold strictly as a pair.” Yeah, do you think someone would go, “Er, I want the left one only, please?”

In case of jihad, break glass:

cabot_jones_double_02

Now for the bad news. (You knew there was going to be bad news, right?)

Yeah, it seems that all you guys who couldn’t afford last week’s Johnson MG semi conversion can’t afford this, either.

In fact, you’d need to afford three of the Johnny guns to play in this league, as the fixed price is $26,500.

But if you ever wondered what Gulf Arab princelings with diplomatic immunity buy when they’re gun shopping, this may be the answer.

Here’s what Cabot Guns says about the Jones 1911:

The Jones 1911 is Cabot’s flagship pistol, the gun that started an obsession, and the project during which we re-wrote all the rules. The introduction of Cabot Guns and the Jones 1911 to the firearms market has done more than turn heads; it’s turned the industry upside down.

Jones1911

This is the base Jones.

Our history as a firearms manufacturer begins during the recession of 2008, with the economy slowing and the primary customers of our manufacturing facility – Penn United Technologies – tightening their belts, the engineers, machinists, and nano-technologists at Cabot found themselves with some extra time on their hands. From men and women who dedicate their lives to servicing the needs of America’s precision-demanding aerospace industries, sprouted the idea to apply that same attention to detail, near excessive dedication to quality control, and pride in our craft to the creation of the perfect firearm. We’re a company with deeply seeded American roots and an unwavering commitment to American prowess; there was no question as to which firearm we would produce – it had to be the Browning pistol, model 1911. We’ve introduced more than “just another 1911” to the firearms community, we’ve created the new standard in precision pistols – we’ve brought the 1911 into the 21st century.

It takes more than machines to make art, more than precision to create perfection; we’ve understood this since our beginnings over 40 years ago. Penn United’s founder, Carl Jones, was a man with an unmatched belief in American excellence. A passionate innovator and stalwart supporter of American industry, Carl taught us that by perfecting our craft and investing in our people; we could not only be the best in the world at what we do, but that we could in fact build the impossible. This is our promise, this is our creed, and this is our livelihood. We’ve poured our souls into creating the Jones 1911. Hold one. As it warms to your grasp you will feel the welling pride of American excellence that it represents.

The design, manufacture, and perfection of the Jones 1911 is a process we’ve approached without regard to time, cost, or materials; our only concerns are to “do it right, do it better, and to do it American.” Where others create their firearms using forged frames and cast slides, Cabot starts with a solid block of American 4140 Billet Steel and uses computer controlled machining and EDM technology to shape our frames and slides – progressing then on to precision grinding machines to create perfectly consistent fits which leave no tooling marks on our final product.

The Jones 1911 is as innovative as it is historic. One glance and you clearly see the pedigree of the 1911 embodied in the Jones – one stare and you come to realize that it’s a revolution in firearms manufacturing. We’ve pioneered a precision technology for sophisticated industries, a feat which not only enables us to guarantee the precision-fit of the Jones 1911, Though we never intend to become a high-volume manufacturer, we continuously strive to improve on the perfection that is our product.

If you’re ready to meet the new standard of excellence in the engineering and elegance of the 1911 pistol, Mr. Jones waits to greet you. Say hello to art in action.

Please also see our ultra premium Jones Deluxe 1911 model, perhaps the most beautiful 1911 ever crafted.

The guns are a unique combination of high tech and handcraft. The technologies include CNC Machining, EDM wire, EDM Sink, CNC Jig Grinding, and CNC Surface Grinding; the polish is done by hand, and their claim is that there is no tooling mark on their pistol — anywhere. They further claim that the high-tech machining gives them a perfect fit and perfectly interchangeable parts without hand fitting. That leaves the gunsmiths to concentrate on the art of the pistol.

Cabot has a history of making out-of-this-world 1911s, with grips of meteorite metal or mammoth tooth, or a slide of Damascus stainless. The prices are also firmly orbital. A base Jones 1911 will leave the well-heeled pistolero less well-heeled to the tune of $6,450. The one-of-a-kind exotics make the Jones look like a bargain.

Exercise for the reader: imagine John M. Browning back from the dead, and seeing this. Is he more likely to be wowed by the worksmanship, or bemused that nobody has completely replaced his century-old design? You know if he had miraculously lived all this time, he would have kept designing better and better guns. Imagine what he could do with Cabot’s manufacturing technology — this guy who made his prototypes, mostly, with files and other hand tools.

18 thoughts on “Seeing Double?

  1. Al T.

    Kind of amusing that for all that preening, they didn’t dish in the slide stop tail. Makes me think that a shooter wasn’t involved in the designing.

  2. Y.

    This is our promise, this is our creed, and this is our livelihood. We’ve poured our souls into creating the Jones 1911. Hold one. As it warms to your grasp you will feel the welling pride of American excellence that it represents.

    The design, manufacture, and perfection of the Jones 1911 is a process we’ve approached without regard to time, cost, or materials; our only concerns are to “do it right, do it better, and to do it American.” Where others create their firearms using forged frames and cast slides, Cabot starts with a solid block of American 4140 Billet Steel and uses computer controlled machining and EDM technology to shape our frames and slides – progressing then on to precision grinding machines to create perfectly consistent fits which leave no tooling marks on our final product.

    The Jones 1911 is as innovative as it is historic. One glance and you clearly see the pedigree of the 1911 embodied in the Jones – one stare and you come to realize that it’s a revolution in firearms manufacturing. We’ve pioneered a precision technology for sophisticated industries, a feat which not only enables us to guarantee the precision-fit of the Jones 1911, Though we never intend to become a high-volume manufacturer, we continuously strive to improve on the perfection that is our product.

    If you’re ready to meet the new standard of excellence in the engineering and elegance of the 1911 pistol, Mr. Jones waits to greet you. Say hello to art in action.

    Please also see our ultra premium Jones Deluxe 1911 model, perhaps the most beautiful 1911 ever crafted.

    This is extremely high-grade bullshit. Wish it could be shovelled out of the intertubes and used as fertilizer, it’d be very useful.

    Is he more likely to be wowed by the worksmanship, or bemused that nobody has completely replaced his century-old design?

    His 1911 design isn’t sorta-irrelevant?
    Numbers wise, how prevalent is the 1911? Aren’t CZ-75’s and it’s clones more common?

    Though these days there are better overall designs. The rotary locking on Beretta and GP pistols seems inherently better, except it’s probably too costly to make without CNC tools.

    Also, isn’t the Obregon an overall improvement of the 1911 design?

  3. KB_Dave

    By all accounts, Cabot makes a fine 1911. I couldn’t imagine paying $26k for anything that didn’t have a happy switch though.

    1. Hognose Post author

      I don’t think I own anything worth $26k that doesn’t have a deed on file in the courthouse. Maybe one car.

      1. KB_Dave

        My house and Wife’s SUV for me. If I had a ton of disposable income, I’d pay $26k for a full auto M16A1. Not for a mirrored pair of 1911s though.

  4. LSWCHP

    A coupla months ago I shelled out two thousand Australian Pesos for an STI Targetmaster chambered in 9mm.

    Off of a bench, and with my handloads it’ll shoot around a two inch group at 50m (sorry about the mixed units) if I do The Right Thing. I couldn’t really ask more from a 1911.

    Having said that, and ignoring the marketing bullshit for what it is, those are beautiful firearms and I wish I had the coin to buy one.

  5. Ken

    I would like to hear Browning’s opinion of the Glock. I think he would be impressed.

    As far as the pistols in this post. I think the 1911 pistol is most beautiful just as Browning designed it.

  6. Tom Stone

    I had the chance to handle a base model Jones at a gun show and it was a work of art.
    An example of what can be done with modern manufacturing methods.

    Firearms like this have been made for Kings and Emperors for centuries, but give me a stock parkerized 1911 with good fixed sights for carry.

  7. Trone Abeetin

    My mother in laws description of someone having “more money than brains” comes to mind.

  8. WCOG

    Who buys guns in matched pairs in this day and age?

    “Cabot: firearms for the discerning gentleman who must, upon occasion, ask for a meeting”

    1. John D

      Buddy of mine and I bought a matched pair of Vaqueros at the gunshow this weekend- highly tuned for SASS, and in beautiful condition.

      The seller was not going to split the pair.

      So we did…..

  9. Mike_C

    do you think someone would go, “Er, I want the left one only, please?”
    Unlikely, but you never know. I own a set of circa 1950’s Britannicas because of something like that. So I’m looking at books at this church rummage sale, when a slightly “off” seeming elderly Indian man wanders up to the cashier clutching a single volume of the Britannica (somewhere in the M’s as I recall) and announces he wants to buy that “one book.” Somewhat perplexedly, the cashier asks if he doesn’t want the rest of the set. No, he just wants that one book. Then he starts dithering about the 50-cent price (hardcovers 50 cents, softcovers 25 cents), lays the volume down on the counter and steps back.

    I couldn’t take it any more. I told the cashier that I was buying the set and handed her a twenty. As the volunteers were looking around for some boxes to pack up the set a nice lady came over and started a conversation. Turned out she was a retired librarian and on the verge of buying the encyclopedia herself, for the same reason as me, to keep the set from being broken up. We had a nice chat about books and bibliophiles. I was dreading explaining this Quixotic flight of fancy to the spouse, but when I got home she actually expressed approval. The complete Britannica still sits on one of the five living room bookcases. (Though to be honest, the amusement value of having your own hardcopy encyclopedia wears off quite rapidly.)

    1. Mike_C

      Oh, yeah. I do realize it’s entirely possible I was expertly manipulated by those sneaky rummage-sale church folk. For all I know that Indian man was an agent who spent the whole afternoon wandering up to the counter trying to pay for a single volume, and no one was dumb enough to bite until I showed up. :-)

  10. Martin S

    Browning was in the process of developing the High Power when he died. As a Norwegian I am as bound to the church of JMB and the 1911 as any red-blooded american, but 15 years after the 1911 JMB had moved on. He would probably be amazed at the 1911s longevity, and the long period of under-adoption of better systems across the board (cam beats link in my mind).

    But i dont think he’d be very shocked by how allmost every pistol is a Browning cammed tilting barrel to this day. There simply are to few methods to do what it does, and none of them are really better. Just like the flintlock, we will use the weapons of today untill we get something actually better, probably when they make “Phased Plasma rifles in the 40 watt range”. Untill then, metallic cartridge weapons of current (1900 to about 1950s/1960s) design will be the best there is.

    Ultimately current firearms represent more than half a millenium of firearms development, and are in my opinion likely to be the end of the road for conventional chemically propelled metal projectiles. What comes next will be something so far removed we’ll not even be able to define it as a ‘fire’arm.

  11. TRX

    If you wanted a pair of matched opposite-handed 1911s you could buy a pair of Randalls and send them off to your favorite 1911 boutique to have them refurbished to whatever level of bling you wanted. And then they’d be custom guns, not some overmarketed off-the-shelf stuff.

    I’d go for two lefties, through. I can’t shoot right-handed, and I’d be just as happy if ejected brass never hit me in the face again.

  12. Dyspeptic Gunsmith

    There’s a sub-market in fine (and sometimes, not quite fine) firearms that were made or sold in pairs. One example I can think of off the top of my head from a mass-production gunmaker not usually associated with fine guns was Remington making pairs of their 3200 O/U shotgun, one for trap, one for skeet, sold as a pair, back in the early 70’s. The 3200 is a fine design – you can see what the Germans did with it in the Krieghoff K-80, which is a staple among high level trap competitors today, and the K-80 sells new starting about $11+K and going up to the mid-20’s. I think you can find a paired set of 3200’s today for, oh, $5K on up. The finish was OK, but nothing special.

    Another example are the some of the Brit “best gun” makers, putting out pairs of guns (SxS or O/U – usually SxS) and sold as a pair, in one wooden case. Sometimes, some gunmakers would put out a double rifle & shotgun as a matching set. The wood gun cases alone are usually worth $500 to $1500 – without anything in them. As with many of the Brit “best guns,” the price of a single gun is often $25K on the low end, and for a matched pair or a set, or even a SxS gun made with a set of barrels (with varying tube lengths and fixed chokes) in a matched fine wood case, you might be looking at $50K and up.

    Some people have put together sets of guns that we’re sold as a set – eg, there are the Colt collectors who have taken the time and trouble to assemble a set of all the “snake” revolvers in 100% condition. Sold individually, none of them are cheap. Sold as a set where all are in perfect condition? Well now, the set is worth more than the mere sum of the individual guns – because it took time and serious effort to put together the set.

    Most people don’t understand why anyone would pay that much for a single gun, never mind having two exactly identical guns. In this case, the mirror-image 1911’s are a pretty neat touch, and it is quite likely that not many will be made. At these levels in the gun market, there are collectors who know what these guns will bring, and high-end guns enjoy a relatively firm market over the years. High end collector-grade guns rarely go down substantially in value unless someone got a fit of the stupids and radically over-paid for the gun in the first place.

    As to the question “what would JMB think?” Well, being a) a gunsmith myself and b) someone who has studied JMB’s designs, tried to put myself into his shoes when he was faced with “how do I solve this problem?” and done a fair bit of research on the man himself, I think he’d be impressed with the level of finish, especially the level of finish being claimed on the interior of the gun. A look at JMB’s personal guns shows that he wasn’t one to leave his guns looking like shop mules – he liked a nice finish on his guns. From the military standpoint, JMB also understood the manufacturing issues of his day and incorporated manufacturing issues into his designs for mass-production guns. You might as well as “What would JMB think of entire companies being based on his lever-action designs?” You could also ask “Why would anyone base a company on the Sharps falling block, when the Mauser bolt action is so much handier, faster, etc?” Well, there are two companies north of me in Big Timber, MT who crank out Sharps-design rifles, and who crank out enough of them every year at prices that start in the $3K range to support a combined staffing level of about two dozen people. In the little town of Big Timber, that’s a pretty good private sector employer.

    If anyone who is interested goes back and looks at the fit and finish on a commercial Colt 1911 from 80 to 100 years ago, they will see a gun that is very nicely finished – which, if in 95% or better condition today, brings big, big money.

    When people ask “Why are people so hung up on the 1911?” I respond “Why are so many people Luger collectors? Why does the US military continue using the M-2 for a heavy machine gun?” Answer both of those questions at once: (a) because people *like* the Luger, they like the lines, they like the way it feels in their hand, they like the way they go together and come apart, and b) because the M-2 works and it works damn well), and you have your answer.

  13. archy

    Looks like the magazines aren’t mirror-image, but are set up for standard mags with the magazine catch on the left side. I wonder how the magazine follower is rigged to raise the slide stop on the southpaw version.

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